Book Information

“One woman’s startling firsthand account of her struggle to protect her children while facing the man she married, a combat veteran plagued by addiction, rage, and depression born from PTSD….A powerful story of pain and forgiveness, horror and hope, Blind Devotion gives voice (and offers hope and resources) to the thousands of families who are struggling to heal and to achieve the sense of normalcy stolen by the trauma in their lives.”

Click here to order on Amazon.

Click here to order on Barnes and Noble.

What People are Saying about Blind Devotion:

“Searingly honest and remarkably brave true story… A remarkable testament to the unquestioning power of love against all other odds, including the most destructive mental illness…Prinsen’s writing constantly draws you deeper into the book, and her narration of the story is so engaging and thought-provoking that this will appeal to every reader.”   — Stefan Walters, MFT;  PsychCentral.com

“The path marked by her memoir…radiates strength and serenity.”   — Publishers Weekly

“…brought tears to my eyes and left me holding my breath throughout parts of the book…This book is a MUST READ for those looking for comfort in their own personal battles.”  (Amazon review)

“If you are looking for a book that you can start and then put down this is NOT for you. I tried just that and found myself getting back out of bed to finish it.”  (Review on Hazelden.org)

“It was fantastically written…. a compelling story that I believe will help a lot of families… The resource sections throughout the book are well-researched and point the way to help for those who are seeking it… I will be using it myself in my work with families affected by these issues.–Jennifer Gruba, MS, LMFT  Marriage and Family Therapist

“I strongly encourage people, especially wives of veterans, to read Blind Devotion. This book is an eye-opener to anyone that reads it whether it be in the sense of bringing awareness to life following deployments or bringing comfort to so many in knowing they are not alone.”  — Family of a Vet.com

“It is clear this story was told to help others instead of writing it just to make a profit. The resources given in the book will be incredibly helpful for anyone dealing with PTSD and addiction, particularly stemming from combat trauma.”  — Torrey Shannon (Amazon review)

“This book certainly shows us that if you never lose hope and faith in any adverse situation the darkness of night always finishes with light of day.”  –Debra (Amazon review)

“It is not only a story of “survival on the frontlines”– It is a story filled with healing, hope and knowledge…”  —bdprin (Amazon review)

“I absolutely loved this book. It held my attention and I couldn’t put it down. A riveting story.”  (Amazon review)

“The book was well-written, and, in fact, I stayed awake all night reading it.” — A. Starkey  (Amazon review)

For those in Christian ministry, please CLICK HERE for an important note about the book.

An Excerpt from Blind Devotion:

“Tell the officers I’m coming out with the kids! Tell them it’s us coming out! Don’t let them shoot at my kids!”. . . I threw the phone down, looped the bag over my shoulder, and went to wake up my son. “Michael,” I whispered as I shook his shoulders. “Wake up, Honey. We have to go, right now. You need to listen to Mommy and do exactly what I say, OK?”

In an instant, my four-year-old was on his feet, reminding me so much of his father who would startle from his sleep at the slightest sound, feet on the floor and at attention, ready to receive his orders. My son’s eyes were wide with fear and confusion. He was wearing nothing but his underwear, but I didn’t have time to get him dressed. He clung to my leg as I went into the nursery to grab my infant daughter. My sobs caught in my throat as I wrapped her in a blanket and ran for the door with Michael glued to my side.

“Michael,” I said, trying to keep my voice calm for my son’s sake. “When I open this door, I need you to run with me as fast as you can to the car. And when you get in, I need you to get down on the floor in the back seat.” Now he was terrified, his tears welling up. “Mommy. . .” he started, but I cut him off. “Just do it, Michael, please!”

My little girl, still lost in slumber when I picked her up, was now stirring in my arms, rubbing the sleep from her eyes. I took a deep breath, opened the door, and ran with my children to the car parked outside. As Michael climbed in, I could hear my husband just a few yards away, still raging at the officers who were concealed in the darkness. My heart raced as I threw my baby girl into the car with such haste that she rolled across the seat and bumped her head on the passenger door.

The sound of her startled cries and Michael’s whimpers from the back seat were too much for me. As I tore down the long driveway, my head swirled with the surreal sounds around me—the baby’s screams, Michael’s sobs, the drone of the search helicopter overhead, the ranting of my husband. It all blurred together into a chilling soundtrack. Everything seemed to move in slow motion. I knew from the direction of my husband’s voice just a few minutes ago that I was driving right between him and the officers with whom he was locked in a deadly standoff. My mind grappled to make sense of it.

This is like a movie. . . Is this really happening to me?

I gripped the steering wheel and braced myself, convinced that the next sound to join the eerie symphony would be a gunshot echoing through the night.  And then my husband would be dead. Or I would be. Or one of the children.

For those in Christian ministry, if you haven’t already done so, please CLICK HERE for an important note about the book.

Click here to order on Amazon.

Click here to order on Barnes and Noble.

 

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